The DubTalk ft. Hamza

Hamza’s newly released EP “Tracks from Mars” was one of the key windows we got into the outcome of his practiced craft. He performed the EP’s title track as well as “One Two”, both tracks clearly demonstrating his self professed obsession with writing short, dense lines painting tales in pictures. His performance of his poem “Impassable Stretches” was our second opportunity to see him at work, albeit in a different frame of mind. For Hamza, rap and poetry occupy two distinct modes of expression that, although sometimes utilizing the same techniques, scratch different pieces of his artistic itch. If you’re pressed for time, you can see the performances on our new series “TRAX”, which is a compilation of all of the performances from The DubTalk.Related Links: Raymond Antrobus‘ collection of poems The Perseverance. The HBO series, Def Poetry Jam, from which you should find clips. TQ’s track “Westside” Scott Storch’s Wiki. Mike...

TRAX by Hamza | The DubTalk

Hamza is the second guest to be featured on this season of The DubTalk. As you know if you’ve been keeping up with the weekly updates, we’ve decided to upload shorter compilations of some of the best moments from the episode in the lead up to its release. Our first new series is TRAX, a collection of all of the pieces performed by our guest. Hamza’s first piece is the title track off “Tracks from Mars”. He opens his EP with a clear statement of intent and style, which he delivered in the studio in his typical understated nonchalance. The second piece is a poem entitled “Impassable Stretches” wherein Hamza comes to a realization about depression while sitting in a chapel in solitude. His third and final performance in the K12 was a cheeky little number from “Tracks from Mars” entitled “One Two”. This track is a nod to all...

The DubTalk ft. Breezy

Season 3 is here, and for the first time, The DubTalk is on video. We invited Breezy to the K12 studio to talk about her new “Tragic Mulatto” EP. The session is a wealth of knowledge and infectious improvised tunes. From minute one, Breezy was candid and honest with Lex and Eli. Off of the back of her open demeanor, we quickly dove into serious conversation about her road to “Tragic Mulatto”. Returning to American culture was rough for Breezy after a year in Berlin studying at dBs Music Berlin. She spent some dramatic time in L.A., which ended in her decision to return back to her home on the east coast. It was there that “Tragic Mulatto” grew into the moving piece of music that it is. The album is informed by “sources”, as Breezy calls them in the interview. These short skit-like interludes come between each track and...